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Characteristics of Drivers Stopped by Police, 2002

NCJ Number
211471
Date Published
June 2006
Length
12 pages
Author(s)
Erica L Smith; Matthew R Durose
Agencies
BJS
Publication Series
Publication Type
Statistics
Annotation
This report presents data on the nature and characteristics of drivers stopped by police in 2002.
Abstract
This report presents data on the nature and characteristics of traffic stops, as collected in the 2002 Police Public Contact Survey, a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Detailed demographic information is presented on the 16.8 million drivers stopped by police in 2002. The report provides statistics about various outcomes of traffic stops, including searches conducted by police, tickets issued to drivers stopped for speeding, arrests of stopped drivers, and police use of force during a traffic stop. The report also discusses the relevance of the survey findings to the issue of racial profiling and provides comparative analysis with prior survey findings. Highlights of the report include the following: (1) in 2002, an estimated 8.7 percent of drivers age 16 or older were stopped by police, representing nearly 17 million of the 193 million drivers in the United States; (2) among traffic stops of young male drivers in 2002, 11 percent were physically searched or had their vehicle searched by police. Among these young male drivers who were stopped and searched, African-American (22 percent) and Hispanics (17 percent) were searched at higher rates than Whites (8 percent); and (3) White drivers were more likely than both African-American and Hispanic drivers to be stopped by police for speeding. Subsequent to being stopped for speeding, African-Americans (78 percent) and Hispanics (85 percent) were more likely than Whites (70 percent) to receive a ticket. Tables and appendixes A-B
Date Created: June 5, 2019