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Police Chief, Volume 81, Issue 3, March 2014

NCJ Number
247612
Editor(s)
Gene Voegtlin
Date Published
March 2014
Length
0 pages
Annotation
This issue has feature articles that address police recruitment, job applicant processing, and an innovative approach for dealing with street gangs.
Abstract
"Recruiting Today for Tomorrow's Agency" presents selected police officers' visions of policing 10 years in the future. "Realistic Job Previews: Reworking Your Recruitment Messaging and Strategies To Reach Today's Candidates" notes that even during difficult economic times when many employers have many job applicants, the quality of law enforcement job candidates continues to be a concern. "Innovative Injunctions Wrest Long Beach Streets From Gang's Grip" describes the Long Beach Police Department's (California) use of court injunctions (much like restraining orders) to apply to apply to large numbers of people at a time, barring them from engaging in anything the local legal system deems to be gang activity. Such injunctions are being used to keep gang members from engaging in various public behaviors by gang members; for example, the latest injunctions enable police to arrest anyone proven to be a member of a targeted gang. Upon conviction, they face 3 months jail time for a host of activities, many of which are legal for non-gang members. "Enhancing Recruitment Efforts Nationwide through K-12 School Partnerships" recommends police agencies partner with schools to encourage involvement and employment in public service. "The Role of Pre-employment Screenings" emphasizes the importance of selecting law enforcement job applicants that are most likely to move on to the recruit training academy. "Medical Screening of Police Applicants" reviews methods and best practices for medical evaluation of police job applicants. "Building a Better Workforce Through the Use of Pre-employment Psychological Evaluations advocates such reliable evaluations as a cost-effective means of ensuring recruits have the psychological resources to perform the requirements and cope with the stress of policing. Regular magazine columns and departments also discuss various police-related topics.