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FY 2019 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) Fact Sheet: Purpose Area 6 - Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities

NCJ Number
252480
Date Published
November 2018
Length
2 pages
Agencies
BJA-Sponsored
Publication Type
Report (Technical Assistance), Report (Grant Sponsored), Program/Project Description, Legislation/Policy Description
Grant Number(s)
2016-IC-BX-K002
Annotation
This Fact Sheet profiles federal funding and other resources available to Indian communities for protecting and assisting their children under the provisions of the Children's Justice and Assistance Act (CJA) of 1986.
Abstract
The resources of the CJA are administered under the U.S. Department of Justice's (DOJ's) Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS), which was established in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 in response to concerns raised by Tribal leaders about the DOJ's grant process, which did not provide the flexibility Tribes needed to address their criminal justice and public safety needs. Through CTAS, federally recognized Tribes and Tribal consortia can submit a single application for most of DOJ's Tribal grant programs. CTAS is not a program, but rather is the overarching structure under which 10 separate grant program applications are collected. Under Purpose Area 6, of the 10 CTAS grant programs, Tribes are offered funding, technical assistance, and training to assist them in developing and operating programs designed to improve the investigation, prosecution, and handling of cases of criminal child abuse and neglect in a manner that lessens trauma for child victims. This Fact Sheet describes the particular resources of Purpose Area 6 that are available for staffing; coordination, outreach, and awareness; cultural and traditional practices; victim assistance; travel; additional training; equipment and supplies; and expanding services. In addition, major sections of this Fact Sheet describe ongoing support, funding and eligibility, and benefits available to address tribal children's exposure to violence, which occurs at higher rates for Indian children than for children of any other racial or ethnic group in America.
Date Created: December 4, 2018