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Information Technology Acquisition, Final Report

NCJ Number
204026
Date Published
August 2002
Length
97 pages
Author(s)
Tom McEwen; Randall Guynes; Julie Wartell; Steve Pendleton
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored
Publication Type
Report (Technical Assistance)
Grant Number(s)
98-LB-VX-K011
Annotation
This document presents an overview of the Information Technology Acquisition Project, which aids law enforcement agencies in acquiring up-to-date information technology.
Abstract
The project’s objectives include developing guidelines in information technology (IT) acquisition; identifying organizational constraints and needs; compiling a list of resources; and raising law enforcement awareness of IT acquisition issues. Chapter 1 offers an overview of the technologies selected for in-depth study; the methodology for the project; and the state of IT acquisition in law enforcement. Chapter 2 presents a four-phase process that law enforcement agencies can follow in acquiring information technology. Those phases are assessment and decisionmaking, procurement, implementation, and impact assessment. Chapter 3 describes assessment and decisionmaking, the first two phases of technology acquisition. The chapter also presents findings on why an agency decides to purchase a new technology and what it decides to buy. Chapter 4 describes the procurement phase, where agencies select a procurement method, develop the requirements for that procurement method, select the vendor with the best value for the procurement, and negotiate a contract. Chapter 5 provides information on implementation methods, support structure, risk analysis and management, and training. In chapter 6, the impact assessment is discussed, along with measures of success and unintended consequences. Chapter 7 describes the process of managing the technology process, which includes institutionalizing change and acceptance, establishing an organizational structure, using technology effectively, and recognizing problems. Chapter 8 provides the conclusions of the survey of police agencies and policy implications regarding acquisition of IT.
Date Created: January 4, 2006