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Integrated Reentry and Employment Strategies: Reducing Recidivism and Promoting Job Readiness

NCJ Number
243628
Date Published
September 2013
Length
76 pages
Author(s)
Le'Ann Duran; Martha Plotkin; Phoebe Potter; Henry Rosen
Agencies
BJA-Sponsored
Publication Type
Policy/Procedure Handbook/Manual
Annotation
This report presents a set of strategies for reducing recidivism and improving employment opportunities for recently released inmates.
Abstract
This report from the Council of State Governments Justice Center presents a set of strategies for reducing recidivism and improving employment opportunities for recently released inmates. The paper is intended for use by policymakers and practitioners who recognize the need for improved collaboration between the corrections and workforce development fields. Research has shown that the successful reintegration of inmates back into communities reduces recidivism and makes communities and families safer and more stable. This paper stresses the need for limited resources to be used in a manner that is most effective - targeting individuals based on their level of risk for future criminal activity. The paper is divided into three sections. The first section What Works to Reduce Recidivism: Principles for Improving Outcomes among Unemployed Individuals with Corrections System-Involvement discusses the three components of the RNR (Risk-Need-Responsivity) Principles and how they can be integrated into the Resource-Allocation and Service-Matching Tool. The second section of the paper discusses Proven and Promising Practices for Improving Outcomes for Hard-to-Employ Individuals. The third section of the paper addresses the Resource-Allocation and Service-Matching Tool: An Integrated Approach to Reducing Recidivism and Improving Employment Outcomes. This section includes a discussion on how policymakers, system administrators, and practitioners can use the tool to provide targeted services to probationers and recently released inmates. It is hoped that the use of this tool will make the most of limited resources, focus efforts on programming with the greatest impact, expand the use of objective, validated tools to reduce recidivism and provide continuity of care, and break the cycle re-incarceration and strengthen communities. 91 notes
Date Created: September 19, 2013