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Requests for Police Assistance, 2011

NCJ Number
242938
Date Published
September 2013
Length
12 pages
Author(s)
Matthew Durose; Lynn Langton Ph.D.
Agencies
BJS
Publication Series
Annotation
This report provides information on the number of persons who requested police assistance in fiscal year 2011.
Abstract
This report from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), presents information on the number of persons who requested police assistance in fiscal year (FY) 2011. Highlights of the findings include the following: an estimated 1 in 8 U.S. residents age 16 or older, or 31.4 million persons, requested assistance from police at least once, primarily to report a crime, suspicious activity, or neighborhood disturbance; the majority of persons who requested police assistance felt the officers acted properly (93 percent) and were helpful (86 percent), while about 85 percent of persons who requested police assistance were satisfied with the police response; and no statistical differences were found between the percentage of Hispanics (86 percent), Blacks (85 percent), and Whites (83 percent) who reported a crime or neighborhood disturbance and felt the police were helpful. The study also found that 93 percent of persons who requested police assistance felt the officers spent an appropriate amount of time with them during the contact, and the majority of persons who requested police assistance reported that they were just as likely or more likely to contact the police again for a similar problem. This report was compiled to examine the characteristics and experiences of persons who contacted law enforcement for assistance during FY 2011. Data for the report were obtained from BJS's 2011 Police-Public Contact Survey, a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Tables, figure, and appendixes

Date Created: September 24, 2013