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Crime in Cape Town: Results of a City Victim Survey

NCJ Number
176682
Author(s)
L Camerer; A Louw; M Shaw; L Artz; W Scharf
Date Published
1998
Length
137 pages
Annotation
This document examines the findings of a victim survey in Cape Town, South Africa.
Abstract
Almost half of Cape Town's residents (49.6 percent) were victims of crime over a 5-year period (1993-1997). Most property crimes were well reported, while only about half of some violent and interpersonal crimes ever came to police attention. Citizens did not report incidents because they regarded them as not serious enough to bother with, the police were not around, or the police were not to be trusted. The majority of victims who reported crimes to police were not satisfied with the way in which the police dealt with their reports. African and colored residents were mostly affected by violent and property crime, while white residents were disproportionately affected by property crime. Those residents most at risk of crime were colored men between the ages of 21 and 35. The report includes data on levels, specifics and responses to victimization, fear of crime, perceptions of police effectiveness and victim assistance. Figures, tables, notes, appendixes