U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Development of Racial-Ethnic Identity Among First Nation Children

NCJ Number
245775
Journal
Journal of Youth and Adolescence Volume: 43 Issue: 3 Dated: March 2014 Pages: 356-374
Author(s)
Barry Corenblum
Date Published
March 2014
Length
19 pages
Annotation
The present study explored the developmental trajectory of some of those components among Native Canadian children living on relatively remote First Nation communities.
Abstract
Elements of racial-ethnic identity, often found among adolescents from racial-ethnic minority groups, have their origins in middle childhood and pre-adolescence. The present study explored the developmental trajectory of some of those components among Native Canadian children living on relatively remote First Nation communities. Children and young adolescents (N = 414,209 female) between the ages of 6-11 completed measures assessing their level of racial-ethnic identity, concrete operational thought, implicit and explicit self-esteem, implicit and explicit in-group attitudes, and the importance of their racial-ethnic identity each year for 5 years. Consistent with predictions from cognitive developmental theory, trajectory modeling revealed significant increases over time in explicit and implicit in-group attitudes, level of concrete operational thought and the importance of children's racial-ethnic identity. However, level of racial-ethnic identity remained unchanged over time. The results are discussed in terms of cognitive-developmental theory, and the influence of living in a racially homogeneous environment on the development of racial-ethnic identity among minority group children. Studies are also suggested for future research. Abstract published by arrangement with Springer.