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Negative Parenting Behavior and Childhood Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Differential Moderation by Positive and Negative Peer Regard

NCJ Number
246490
Journal
Aggressive Behavior Volume: 40 Issue: 1 Dated: January 2014 Pages: 79-90
Author(s)
Irene Tung; Steve S. Lee
Date Published
January 2014
Length
12 pages
Annotation
Although negative parenting behavior and peer status are independently associated with childhood conduct problems e.g., oppositional defiant disorder ODD, relatively little is known about their interplay, particularly in relation to differentiated measures of positive and negative peer regard.
Abstract
Although negative parenting behavior and peer status are independently associated with childhood conduct problems e.g., oppositional defiant disorder ODD, relatively little is known about their interplay, particularly in relation to differentiated measures of positive and negative peer regard. To improve the specificity of the association of negative parenting behavior and peer factors with ODD, we explored the potential interaction of parenting and peer status in a sample of 169 five-to ten-year-old ethnically diverse children with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ADHD assessed using multiple measures i.e., rating scales, interview and informants i.e., parents, teachers. Controlling for children's age, sex, number of ADHD symptoms, and parents' race-ethnicity, peer acceptance inversely predicted and inconsistent discipline, harsh punishment, and peer rejection were each positively associated with ODD symptom severity. Interactive influences were also evident such that inconsistent discipline and harsh punishment each predicted elevated ODD but only among children experiencing low peer acceptance or high peer rejection. These findings suggest that supportive environments, including peer acceptance, may protect children from negative outcomes associated with inconsistent discipline and harsh punishment. Findings are integrated with theories of social support, and we additionally consider implications for intervention and prevention. Abstract published by arrangement with Wiley.