U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

NCJRS Virtual Library

The Virtual Library houses over 235,000 criminal justice resources, including all known OJP works.
Click here to search the NCJRS Virtual Library

NextGen serology: leveraging mass spectrometry for protein-based human body fluid identification

NCJ Number
305913
Journal
ACS Symposium Series Volume: 1339 Dated: 8 November 2019
Author(s)
Heather E. McKiernan; Catherine O. Brown; Luciano Chaves Arantes; Phillip B. Danielson; Kevin M. Legg
Date Published
2019
Annotation

In profiling “nextgen serology,” this article discusses the utility of mass spectrometry as a unified platform for both high-sensitivity confirmatory body fluid identification and sample prioritization to optimize downstream genetic analyses.

Abstract

Comprehensive proteome mapping and comparative analyses by multidimensional high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) in combination with Q-TOF mass spectrometry have successfully identified and verified a series of protein “biomarker panels” for six body fluids (i.e., peripheral and menstrual blood, vaginal secretions, semen, urine, and saliva). Research and development activities have focused on the development of a multiplexed serological assay for the single-pass identification of these body fluids that all have clear forensic relevance. Using an automation platform for front-end sample preparation and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatograph (UHPLC) for mass analysis, the resulting workflow was designed to meet the demanding needs of a forensic operational environment. To date, a panel of robust and high-specificity biomarkers for human biological fluid identification has been developed with a run time of only 10 minutes. In conjunction with the automation platform, several hundred samples can be analyzed per week. Rigorous developmental validation studies and testing using casework-type samples have established the accuracy and sensitivity of the assay. The data generated demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry as a unified platform for both high-sensitivity confirmatory body fluid identification and sample prioritization to optimize downstream genetic analyses. (Published abstract provided)