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Preferences for Police Response to Domestic Violence: A Comparison of College Students in Three Chinese Societies

NCJ Number
239752
Journal
Journal of Family Violence Volume: 27 Issue: 2 Dated: February 2012 Pages: 133-144
Author(s)
Ivan Y. Sun; Yuning Wu; Lanying Huang; Yushen Lin; Jessica C.M. Li; Mingyue Su
Date Published
February 2012
Length
12 pages
Annotation
This study compared college students' preferences for traditional and proactive police intervention into domestic violence and assesses the determinants of such preferences in the three Chinese societies.
Abstract
While a large amount of research has been conducted in the West on domestic violence related issues, only a small number of studies have focused specifically on Chinese societies. Using survey data collected from Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei, this study compares college students' preferences for traditional and proactive police intervention into domestic violence and assesses the determinants of such preferences in the three Chinese societies. The findings indicate that Hong Kong students showed the highest level of support for traditional police response, followed by students in Beijing and Taipei, while students in Taipei displayed the strongest preference for proactive police response, followed by students in Hong Kong and Beijing. College students' preferences for traditional police response were shaped mainly by their locality, whereas their preferences for proactive police intervention were influenced chiefly by their attitudes toward violence and gender roles. Directions for future research are discussed. Abstract published by arrangement with Springer.