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Test of the Importation and Work Environment Models: The Effects of Work Ethic. Importance of Money, and Management Views on the Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment of Correctional Staff

NCJ Number
227549
Journal
Journal of Crime and Justice Volume: 32 Issue: 1 Dated: 2009 Pages: 61-92
Author(s)
Eric G. Lambert; Nancy L. Hogan
Date Published
2009
Length
32 pages
Annotation
This study examined factors affecting job satisfaction and organizational commitment at a private Midwestern correctional organization.
Abstract
Findings resulted in three primary conclusions: that personal characteristics might not be important in directly shaping the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of correctional employees; the impact of the specific importation and work environment variables on job satisfaction and organizational commitment vary; and that the importation model should not be dismissed. While the personal characteristics of gender, age, tenure, race, educational level, and position did not demonstrate a strong relationship with the dependent variable of job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the present research, there is some indication that they may have indirect effects which are mediated by work ethic, importance of money, trust in management, participation in management, and support by management. Position had a significant effect on importance of money, trust in management, participation in management, and support by management. Of six personal characteristics, only gender had a statistically significant impact on job satisfaction, while none of the personal characteristics had a significant effect on organization commitment. Work ethic had the largest impact on job satisfaction. Trust in management was important in developing both job satisfaction and organization commitment. Participation in management decisionmaking was an antecedent for organizational commitment, but not job satisfaction, while support by management had no significant impact in the study. Data were collected from 200 staff at a private Midwestern maximum security correctional facility. Tables, notes, and references