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Vehicular Manslaughter: When Is It Murder?

NCJ Number
157289
Author(s)
G Trask
Date Published
1994
Annotation
This document presents factual scenarios, an outline, and attached policy and case law documents focusing on the determination of when vehicular manslaughter is murder.
Abstract
The scenarios involve deaths during high-speed chases, driving of a stolen car, an attempted escape following a supermarket robbery, an intoxicated driver, and a driver with a suspended license. The eight types of vehicular homicide are defined as felony murder in the first degree, felony murder in the second degree, implied malice murder (Watson) in the second degree, implied malice murder (Fuller) in the second degree, gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, gross vehicular manslaughter, vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, and vehicular manslaughter. The vehicular homicide policy for Riverside County (Calif.) is presented, together with information on implied malice and two Riverside County cases of implied malice