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Parental Cognitive Impairment and Child Maltreatment in Canada

NCJ Number
236237
Journal
Child Abuse & Neglect Volume: 35 Issue: 8 Dated: August 2011 Pages: 621-632
Author(s)
David McConnell; Maurice Feldman; Marjorie Aunos; Narasimha Prasad
Date Published
August 2011
Length
12 pages
Annotation
This study investigated the prevalence of parental cognitive impairment in child maltreatment investigations in Canada.
Abstract
The study found that parental cognitive impairment was indicated in 10.1 percent of the sample of child maltreatment investigations and in 27.3 percent of the sample of child welfare investigations that resulted in substantiation, case disposition, and court application. The most common form of child maltreatment was found to be neglect. The study also found that child demographics and cases characteristics did not affect the predictive value of parental cognitive impairment. This study investigated the prevalence of parental cognitive impairment in child maltreatment investigations in Canada. Data for the study were obtained from secondary analysis of a sample (n=11,562) of child maltreatment investigations in Canada. The data was analyzed to determine the predictive value of parental cognitive impairment on the outcomes of child maltreatment investigations. The findings indicate that parental cognitive impairment is a significant factor in cases of child maltreatment and that a broad spectrum approach is needed to support parents with cognitive impairment and their children. Figures, tables, and references