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Study of Racially Disparate Outcomes in the Los Angeles Police Department

NCJ Number
239471
Author(s)
Ian Ayres; Jonathan Borowsky
Date Published
October 2008
Length
59 pages
Annotation
This study examined the racially disparate outcomes of pedestrian and motor vehicle stops made by the Los Angeles Police Department.
Abstract
Major findings from this study on the racial disparity in pedestrian and motor vehicle stops made by the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) indicate that per 10,000 residents, the Black stop rate is 3,400 stops higher than the White stop rate, and that the Hispanic stop rate is almost 360 stops higher than the White stop rate. In addition, the findings indicate that stopped Blacks are 127 percent more likely and stopped Hispanics are 43 percent more likely to be frisked than stopped Whites; stopped Blacks are 76 percent more likely and stopped Hispanics are 16 more likely to be searched than stopped Whites; and stopped Blacks are 29 percent more likely and stopped Hispanics are 32 percent more likely to be arrested than stopped Whites. This study examined the racial disparity found among pedestrian and motor vehicle stops made by members of the Los Angeles Police Department during the period July 2003 through June 2004. Data for the study was obtained from stop and arrest records of 942 reporting districts in Los Angeles. The study examined stop, citation, and arrest rates across three racial categories in each district: Hispanic, Black, and White to determine the degree to which race played a part in the actions of the LAPD. The findings show that while Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to be stopped, frisked, searched, and arrested than Whites, they are less likely to be found in possession of weapons, drugs, or anything else following the frisk and search by police. Tables, figures, and references