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Information about restorative justice programs for juveniles is available in the following Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) resources:

To learn more about mortgage fraud, see the Fraud Awareness Special Feature and the Don't Be A Victim of Loan Fraud publication from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Additionally, data on the prevalence of mortgage fraud can be located on the Mortgage Fraud section of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) website.

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) report, Duress Systems in Correctional Facilities, discusses duress systems that help officers in correctional facilities respond quickly and effectively to assaults on staff and other emergencies. For additional information, visit the Equipment and Technology section of our Correctional Resources Special Feature.

The National Institute of Justice's CrimeSolutions website provides results of rigorous research to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime victim services.

Go to CrimeSolutions to find:

  • Research on the effectiveness of programs and practices as reviewed by CrimeSolutions researchers and reviewers
  • Easily understandable ratings (Effective, Promising, No Effects) based on the evidence that indicates whether a program or practice achieves its goals
  • Key program and practice information and research findings

For youth programs, see the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)'s Model Program Guide.

Information on the government's plan to protect critical infrastructure within the United States can be found on the National Infrastructure Protection Plan and the Infrastructure Protection sections of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security website.

Additional resources on infrastructure protection are available by conducting a search of our Abstracts Database.

Yes, register with NCJRS to receive these emails:
  • Bi-weekly JUSTINFO newsletter - Access information about publications, events, funding and training opportunities, and web-based resources available from NCJRS federal sponsors.
  • Weekly Funding News From NCJRS email - Receive solicitation releases/updates and funding-related webinars from our federal sponsors.
  • Funding Tips - Get online tools and help as you apply for Office of Justice Programs' funding opportunities.
When you register with NCJRS, be sure to select "Grants/funding" as an area of interest in your NCJRS registration profile.

Visit the Grants and Funding section of our site for additional information and resources.

The National Institute of Justice's CrimeSolutions.gov website provides results of rigorous research to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime victim services.

Go to CrimeSolutions.gov to find:
  • Research on the effectiveness of programs and practices as reviewed by CrimeSolutions.gov researchers and reviewers
  • Easily understandable ratings (Effective, Promising, No Effects) based on the evidence that indicates whether a program or practice achieves its goals
  • Key program and practice information and research findings
For youth programs, see the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)'s Model Program Guide.

Resources on youth gang prevention available through NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors include the following: Additional resources are available on the Juvenile Justice: Gangs section of our site and the National Gang Center (NGC) website.

An overview of curfew enforcement programs can be found in the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) publication, Curfew: An Answer to Juvenile Delinquency & Victimization.

Access information on school-based prevention efforts and their interaction with law enforcement and/or juvenile justice organizations in these publications:
    View these additional resources on school safety and violence:
  • The Department of Justice (DOJ), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Department of Education (ED), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): SchoolSafety.gov
  • NCJRS: School Safety Special Feature